Sunday, September 22, 2019

Causes and Effects of Smoking Essay Example for Free

Causes and Effects of Smoking Essay Causes and Effects of Smoking There are millions of people around the world who smoke daily. They inhale the toxins into their bodies, which can harm them internally. Although you may not be a smoker, there are still chances that you are inhaling the toxins of the cigarrete as well. Thousands of people die a year from smoking; more than car accidents and other sunstance abuse. Smoking can lead to many health problems. People who smoke are at high risks of problems with their heart, lung and respiratory system, ertain types of cancers, premature death, and other health problems. There are several different types of harmful chemicals in tabacco smoke. Out of the 7,000 chemicals in tobacco smoke, at least 250 are known to be harmful, including hydrogen cyanide, carbon monoxide, and ammonia. While there are several different types of chemicals, out of the 250, there are approximately 70 chemicals that can cause cancer. Some of the cancer-causing chemicals are arsenic, beryllium, nickel, vinyl chloride, as well as other chemicals. The types of cancers that smoking can lead to are lung, mouth, esophagus, kidney, stomach, and throat cancer. The more that a person smokes, the higher at risk they are of conceiving these types of cancer; mainly lung cancer. Approximately 90% of people who are diagnosed with lung cancer are caused by smoking. If no one smoked, lung cancer would be a very rare illness. However, for someone who may have quit smoking, it will take approximately 15 years for their lungs to become the same as non-smokers. Smoking can also lead to various types of diseases. One disease that is very common is heart disease. Heart disease is not Just one condition, but it is a group of conditions. The heart has many root causes such as coronary artery disease. If plaque builds up in the arteries, then the blood will not be able to reach the heart. Your heart is a muscle with blood constantly moving in and out. The blood keeps your heart to work properly. But, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, stress, and smoking can lead into coronary artery disease. Other types of diseases that are caused by smoking are Alzheimers disease, bronchitis, emphysema, and several others. Although people do not smoke, they still somehow are diagnosed with cancer or diseases from smoking. How is this exactly? Well, people who dont smoke can still inhale the toxins from cigarettes of people who smoke around them, or in their environment. Second-hand smoking is also known as environmental tobacco smoke or passive smoking. It is the combination of sidestream smoke (the smoke given off by a burning tobacco product) and mainstream smoke (the smoke exhaled by a smoker) Inhaling the moke given off by the cigarette can lead to lung cancer in a non-smoking adult. There are thousands of people who are non-smokers, which die each year from lung cancer. This is because they were exposed to second-hand smoking. Second-hand smoke causes disease and premature death in non-smoking adults and children. Women who are pregnant and exposed to second-hand smoking can give birth to a baby with a low birth weight. While adults can get lung cancer and other diseases, children can also be exposed to second-hand smoking. Children who are exposed to ronchitis, and asthma. It can slow the growth of the childs lungs and cause them to be breathless. In conclusion, smoking can lead to several health problems. Several of these health problems can lead to other types of diseases and cancers, as well as death. Pregnant women and children exposed to second-hand smoking can ruin their health. Smoking affects us and the world because it is one of the leading causes of death. Inhaling the toxins destroys our bodies, and there are more and more people every year who die from these toxins.

Saturday, September 21, 2019

The Philosophy Of Utilitarianism Philosophy Essay

The Philosophy Of Utilitarianism Philosophy Essay This paper will critically analyze Utilitarianism. The philosophy of Utilitarianism focuses on the overall outcome or result of an action. It is believed that this will manifest a greater happiness and moral benefit for society. However, Utilitarianism denies credibility to the intent behind the action but rather the end result or overall outcome. This principle was argued by philosopher John Stuart Mill. In direct opposition to the principles of Utilitarianism, lies the philosopher Immanuel Kant. Kant argues that there must be honorable intentions within an individual to manifest a greater outcome or action within society. I intend to argue that Utilitarianism is the most beneficial and influential of the two perspectives. To summarize Immanuel Kants perspective, he argues that the individual plays a highly important role in the overall happiness or virtue of society. Yet in order to reach the ultimate result or outcome, there are certain characteristics necessary to accomplish this task. In The Good Will and the Categorical Imperative, Kant refers to the materialistic pleasures of society as gifts of fortune. He stresses the importance of good will as a means to balance out our societal mistakes or immorality. Kant states that good will, corrects the influence of these on the mind and, in so doing, also corrects the whole principle of action and brings it into conformity with universal ends, (Kant, Immanuel. The Good Will and the Categorical Imperative. The Good Will. (1998). 591). He further stresses that duty plays a role in furthering the overall outcome of an action. However, the morality behind an action is the manifestation of the initial principle behind the action. He states, the moral worth o f an action does not lie in the effect expected from it and so too does not lie in any principle of action that needs to borrow its motive from the expected effect (Kant, Immanuel. The Good Will and the Categorical Imperative. The Good Will. (1998). 592). To summarize John Stuart Mills Utilitarian perspective, he argues that there is no validity or pertinence in the inclusion of intent. The most important component is the overall outcome. To obtain true happiness or virtue, there must exist a collective amount of virtuous acts. This would benefit society as a whole. In Utilitarianism, Mill argues that honorable or desirable intentions have little bearing or influence on the ultimate action. There are instances when an individual knows that the ultimate outcome will be significant and morally beneficial, but still choose the opposite path. Kant states that men, pursue sensual indulgences to the injury of health, though perfectly aware that health is the greater good (Mill, John S. Utilitarianism Chapter 2. What Utilitarianism Is. (1863). 602). He further stresses what society might experience if the Greatest happiness Principle was in effect. Mill exclaims that this is an existence exempt as far as possible from pain, and as rich as po ssible in enjoyments, both in point of quantity and quality, (Mill, John S. Utilitarianism Chapter 2. What Utilitarianism Is. (1863). 603). Mill went on to argue that in order to have a primary moral principle, there should also be an important set of principles to use it towards. Mill states, Whatever we adopt as the fundamental principle of morality, we require subordinate principles to apply it by, (Mill, John S. Utilitarianism Chapter 2. What Utilitarianism Is. (1863). 609). He concludes his argument by acknowledging that it is difficult to prove morality, and rejects Kants position that morality entirely rests with intention. Mill states, to consider the rules of morality as improvable is one thing; to pass over the intermediate generalizations entirely, and endeavor to test each individual action directly by the first principle is another, (Mill, John S. Utilitarianism Chapter 2. What Utilitarianism Is. (1863). 609). In the article called, The Ends of the Means? Kantian Ethics Vs. Utilitarianism, Erin Terrall summarizes both perspectives. Terrall makes a valuable point when stating, A Utilitarian aspect could be more appropriate for one situation; while a Kantian perspective might be better for another. If one keeps a working knowledge of both philosophies, one can look at life with a broader view, and not get too firmly entrenched in one set of beliefs, (Terrall, Erin. The Ends of the Means? Kantian Ethics Vs. Utilitarianism. (2007). It is evident that both perspectives are highly influential. There are those that spend their lives trying to improve their moral character, in order to insure a greater amount of happiness for themselves and others. Then there are those that ultimately focus on making the most profound impact possible, to pacify the need of a virtuous society. However, when both are in balance, the results can be profound for society as a whole. For example, despite the infestation of racism in the United States of America during the 1950s and 60s, Martin Luther King intended to change the tide of erroneous beliefs. He intended to and set out to educate all men on equality. Very few people could deny that he was a man driven by honorable characteristics and good will. He was compelled by his duty to mankind. His efforts to unite this nation ultimately served a greater purpose for all mankind. His outcome was irrefutably in harmony with his intent. It would be absurd to deny his influence on the virtue of society. His individual efforts made ripples in the pond of society and realigned the moral compass. So it is indeed possible that the two perspectives can be profound when they coincide. Although they are both pertinent to the overall virtue of society, I would have to give greater credibility to Utilitarianism. If Martin Luther King Jr. lacked the courage to take a stand for what was right, would African Americans have been given the right to vote in 1965? As painful as it is to say, I highly doubt it. If Martin Luther King Jr. was merely a man of many honorable intentions, would we give him a national holiday? More than likely, not. There were a multitude of people that had the most honorable of intentions, but none as great of an impact as he. This is not to discredit those who also fought for equal rights. However, no one can deny that Martin Luther King Jr. was in the forefront of this battle. The manifestation of this outcome evolved into a greater respect and understanding of all mankind, regardless of the color of their skin. This propelled and influenced even more significant outcomes of equality and civil rights in the United States. Our virtue is still a w ork in progress, but it is indeed progressing. The outcome will ultimately influence a greater degree of intent and actions. If John Stuart Mills Utilitarian perspective is as pertinent as I and he argues that it is, then idealistically, we are well on our way to living a life that is overflowing with virtue and widespread happiness. Bibliography Page Kant, Immanuel. . The Good Will and the Categorical Imperative. The Good Will. (1998). In Reason and Responsibility: Readings in Some Basic Problems of Philosophy. Fourteenth Edition, Wadsworth, Cengage Learning, Boston, MA, 2011, pp. 591-592. Mill, John S. Utilitarianism Chapter 2. What Utilitarianism Is. (1863). In Reason and Responsibility: Readings in Some Basic Problems of Philosophy. Fourteenth Edition, Wadsworth, Cengage Learning, Boston, MA, 2011, pp. 602-609. Terrall, Erin. The Ends of the Means? Kantian Ethics Vs. Utilitarianism. YahooVoices.com. YahooVoices.com., 11 May. 2007. Web. 14 April 2013. Retrieved online: http://voices.yahoo.com/the-ends-means-kantian-ethics-vs-utilitarianism-337424.html

Friday, September 20, 2019

Data Conversion and Migration Strategy

Data Conversion and Migration Strategy 1. Data Conversion Migration Strategy The scope of this section is to define the data migration strategy from a CRM perspective. By its very nature, CRM is not a wholesale replacement of legacy systems with BSC CRM but rather the coordination and management of customer interaction within the existing application landscape. Therefore a large scale data migration in the traditional sense is not required, only a select few data entities will need to be migrated into BSC CRM. Data migration is typically a ‘one-off activity prior to go-live. Any ongoing data loads required on a frequent or ad-hoc basis are considered to be interfaces, and are not part of the data migration scope. This section outlines how STEE-Infosoft intends to manage the data migration from the CAMS and HPSM legacy systems to the BSC CRM system. STEE-InfoSoft will provide a comprehensive data conversion and migration solution to migrate the current legacy databases of CAMS and HPSM. The solution would adopt the most suitable and appropriate technology for database migration, using our proven methodology and professional expertise. STEE-InfoSofts data migration methodology assures customers the quality, consistency, and accuracy of results. Table 11 shows STEE-InfoSoft data migration values proposition using our methodology. Table 11: STEE-Infosoft data migration values proposition Value Details Cost Effective STEE-InfoSoft adopts a cost-effective data migration solution. Minimal downtime can be achieved for the data migration. Extensive use of automation speed up work and makes post-run changes and corrections practical. Error tracking and correction capabilities help to avoid repeated conversion re-runs. Customization enables getting the job done the correct way Very Short Downtime Downtime is minimized because most of the migration processes are external to the running application system, and do not affect its normal workflow. It further reduces downtime by allowing the data conversion to be performed in stages. Assured Data Integrity Scripts and programs are automatically generated for later use when testing and validating the data. Control Over the Migration Process. Creating unique ETL (Extract, Transform and Load) scripts to run the extract and load processes in order to reduce the downtime of the existing systems. Merging fields, filtering, splitting data, changing field definitions and translating the field content. Addition, Deletion, Transformation, and Aggregation, Validation rules for cleansing data. 1.1. Data Migration Overview Data migration is the transfer of data from one location, storage medium, or hardware/software system to another. Migration efforts are often prompted by the need for upgrades in technical infrastructure or changes in business requirements Best practices in data migration recommends two principles which are inherent for successful data migration: Perform data migration as a project dedicated to the unique objective of establishing a new (target) data store. Perform data migration in four primary phases: Data Migration Planning, Data Migration Analysis and Design, and Data Migration Implementation, and Data Migration Closeout as shown in 1.1. In addition, successful data migration projects were ones that maximized opportunities and mitigated risks. The following critical success factors were identified: Perform data migration as an independent project. Establish and manage expectations throughout the process. Understand current and future data and business requirements. Identify individuals with expertise regarding legacy data. Collect available documentation regarding legacy system(s). Define data migration project roles responsibilities clearly. Perform a comprehensive overview of data content, quality, and structure. Coordinate with business owners and stakeholders to determine importance of business data and data quality. 1.2. STEE-Info Data Migration Project Lifecycle Table 12 lists the high-level processes for each phase of the STEE-Info Data Migration Project Lifecycle. While all data migration projects follow the four phases in the Data Migration Project Lifecycle, the high-level and low-level processes may vary depending on the size, scope and complexity of each migration project. Therefore, the following information should serve as a guideline for developing, evaluating, and implementing data migration efforts. Each high-level and low-level process should be included in a DataMigrationPlan. For those processes not deemed appropriate, a justification for exclusion should be documented in the DataMigrationPlan. Table 12: Data Migration Project Lifecycle with high-level tasks identified. Data Migration Planning Phase Data Migration Analysis Design Phase Data Migration Implementation Phase Data Migration Closeout Phase Plan Data Migration Project Analyze Assessment Results Develop Procedures Document Data Migration Results Determine Data Migration Requirements Define Security Controls Stage Data Document Lessons Learned Assess Current Environment Design Data Environment Cleanse Data Perform Knowledge Transfer Develop Data Migration Plan Design Migration Procedures Convert Transform Data (as needed) Communicate Data Migration Results Define and Assign Team Roles and Responsibilities Validate Data Quality Migrate Data (trial/deployment) Validate Migration Results (iterative) Validate Post-migration Results During the lifecycle of a data migration project, the team moves the data through the activities shown in 1.2 The team will repeat these data management activities as needed to ensure a successful data load to the new target data store. 1.3. Data Migration Guiding Principles 1.3.1. Data Migration Approach 1.3.1.1. Master Data (e.g. Customers, Assets) The approach is that master data will be migrated into CRM providing these conditions hold: The application where the data resides is being replaced by CRM. The master records are required to support CRM functionality post-go-live. There is a key operational, reporting or legal/statutory requirement. The master data is current (e.g. records marked for deletion need not be migrated) OR is required to support another migration. The legacy data is of a sufficient quality such so as not to adversely affect the daily running of the CRM system OR will be cleansed by the business/enhanced sufficiently within the data migration process to meet this requirement. Note: Where the master data resides in an application that is not being replaced by CRM, but is required by CRM to support specific functionality, the data will NOT be migrated but accessed from CRM using a dynamic query look-up. A dynamic query look-up is a real-time query accessing the data in the source application as and when it is required. The advantages of this approach are; Avoids the duplication of data throughout the system landscape. Avoids data within CRM becoming out-of-date. Avoids the development and running of frequent interfaces to update the data within CRM. Reduces the quantity of data within the CRM systems. 1.3.1.2. ‘Open Transactional data (e.g. Service Tickets) The approach is that ‘open transactional data will NOT be migrated to CRM unless ALL these conditions are met: There is a key operational, reporting or legal/statutory requirement The legacy system is to be decommissioned as a result of the BSC CRM project in timescales that would prevent a ‘run down of open items The parallel ‘run down of open items within the legacy system is impractical due to operational, timing or resource constraints The CRM build and structures permit a correct and consistent interpretation of legacy system items alongside CRM-generated items The business owner is able to commit resources to own data reconciliation and sign-off at a detailed level in a timely manner across multiple project phases 1.3.1.3. Historical Master and Transactional data The approach is that historical data will not be migrated unless ALL these conditions are met: There is a key operational, reporting or legal/statutory requirement that cannot be met by using the remaining system The legacy system is to be decommissioned as a direct result of the BSC CRM project within the BSC CRM project timeline An archiving solution could not meet requirements The CRM build and structures permit a correct and consistent interpretation of legacy system items alongside CRM-generated items The business owner is able to commit resources to own data reconciliation and sign-off at a detailed level in a timely manner across multiple project phases 1.3.2. Data Migration Testing Cycles In order to test and verify the migration process it is proposed that there will be three testing cycles before the final live load: Trial Load 1: Unit testing of the extract and load routines. Trial Load 2: The first test of the complete end-to-end data migration process for each data entity. The main purpose of this load is to ensure the extract routines work correctly, the staging area transformation is correct, and the load routines can load the data successfully into CRM. The various data entities will not necessarily be loaded in the same sequence as will be done during the live cutover Trial Cutover: a complete rehearsal of the live data migration process. The execution will be done using the cutover plan in order to validate that the plan is reasonable and possible to complete in the agreed timescale. A final set of cleansing actions will come out of trial cutover (for any records which failed during the migration because of data quality issues). There will be at least one trial cutover. For complex, high-risk, migrations several trial runs may be performed, until the result is entirely satisfactory and 100% correct. Live Cutover: the execution of all tasks required to prepare BSC CRM for the go-live of a particular release. A large majority of these tasks will be related to data migration. 1.3.3. Data Cleansing Before data can be successfully migrated it data needs to be clean, data cleansing is therefore an important element of any data migration activity: Data needs to be in a consistent, standardised and correctly formatted to allow successful migration into CRM (e.g. CRM holds addresses as structured addresses, whereas some legacy systems might hold this data in a freeform format) Data needs to be complete, to ensure that upon migration, all fields which are mandatory in CRM are populated. Any fields flagged as mandatory, which are left blank, will cause the migration to fail. Data needs to be de-duplicated and be of sufficient quality to allow efficient and correct support of the defined business processes. Duplicate records can either be marked for deletion at source (preferred option), or should be excluded in the extract/conversion process. Legacy data fields could have been misused (holding information different from what this field was initially intended to be used for). Data cleansing should pick this up, and a decision needs to be made whether this data should be excluded (i.e. not migrated), or transferred into a more appropriate field. It is the responsibility of the data owner (i.e. MOM) to ensure the data provided to the STEE-Info for migration into BSC CRM (whether this is from a legacy source or a template populated specifically for the BSC CRM) is accurate. Data cleansing should, wherever possible, be done at source, i.e. in the legacy systems, for the following reasons: Unless a data change freeze is put in place, extracted datasets become out of date as soon as they have been extracted, due to updates taking place in the source system. When re-extracting the data at a later date to get the most recent updates, data cleansing actions will get overwritten. Therefore cleansing will have to be repeated each time a new dataset is extracted. In most cases, this is impractical and requires a large effort. Data cleansing is typically a business activity. Therefore, cleansing in the actual legacy system has the advantage that business people already have access to the legacy system, and are also familiar with the application. Something that is not the case when data is stored in staging areas. In certain cases it may be possible to develop a programme to do a certain degree of automated cleansing although this adds additional risk of data errors. If data cleansing is done at source, each time a new (i.e. more recent) extract is taken, the results of the latest cleansing actions will automatically come across in the extract without additional effort. 1.3.4. Pre-Migration Testing Testing breaks down into two core subject areas: logical errors and physical errors. Physical errors are typically syntactical in nature and can be easily identified and resolved. Physical errors have nothing to do with the quality of the mapping effort. Rather, this level of testing is dealing with semantics of the scripting language used in the transformation effort. Testing is where we identify and resolve logical errors. The first step is to execute the mapping. Even if the mapping is completed successfully, we must still ask questions such as: How many records did we expect this script to create? Did the correct number of records get created? Has the data been loaded into the correct fields? Has the data been formatted correctly? The fact is that data mapping often does not make sense to most people until they can physically interact with the new, populated data structures. Frequently, this is where the majority of transformation and mapping requirements will be discovered. Most people simply do not realize they have missed something until it is not there anymore. For this reason, it is critical to unleash them upon the populated target data structures as soon as possible. The data migration testing phase must be reached as soon as possible to ensure that it occurs prior to the design and building phases of the core project. Otherwise, months of development effort can be lost as each additional migration requirement slowly but surely wreaks havoc on the data model. This, in turn, requires substantive modifications to the applications built upon the data model. 1.3.5. Migration Validation Before the migration could be considered a success, one critical step remains: to validate the post-migration environment and confirm that all expectations have been met prior to committing. At a minimum, network access, file permissions, directory structure, and database/applications need to be validated, which is often done via non-production testing. Another good strategy to validate software migration is to benchmark the way business functions pre-migration and then compare that benchmark to the behaviour after migration. The most effective way to collect benchmark measurements is collecting and analyzing Quality Metrics for various Business Areas and their corresponding affairs. 1.3.6. Data Conversion Process Mapped information and data conversion program will be put into use during this period. Duration and timeframe of this process will depend on: Amount of data to be migrated Number of legacy system to be migrated Resources limitation such as server performance Error which were churned out by this process The conversion error management approach aims to reject all records containing a serious error as soon as possible during the conversion approach. Correction facilities are provided during the conversion; where possible, these will use the existing amendment interface. Errors can be classified as follows: Fatal errors which are so serious that they prevent the account from being loaded onto the database. These will include errors that cause a breach of database integrity; such as duplicate primary keys or invalid foreign key references. These errors will be the focus of data cleansing both before and during the conversion. Attempts to correct errors without user interaction are usually futile. Non-fatal errors which are less serious. Load the affected error onto the database, still containing the error, and the error will be communicated to the user via a work management item attached to the record. The error will then be corrected with information from user. Auto-corrected errors for which the offending data item is replaced by a previously agreed value by the conversion modules. This is done before the conversion process starts together with user to determine values which need to be updated. One of the important tasks in the process of data conversion is data validation. Data validation in a broad sense includes the checking of the translation process per se or checking the information to see to what degree the conversion process is an information preserving mapping. Some of the common verification methods used will be: Financial verifications (verifying pre- to post-conversion totals for key financial values, verify subsidiary to general ledger totals) to be conducted centrally in the presence of accounts, audit, compliance risk management; Mandatory exceptions verifications and rectifications (on those exceptions that must be resolved to avoid production problems) to be reviewed centrally but branches to execute and confirm rectifications, again, in the presence of network management, audit, compliance risk management; Detailed verifications (where full details are printed and the users will need to do random detailed verifications with legacy system data) to be conducted at branches with final confirmation sign-off by branch deployment and branch manager; and Electronic files matching (matching field by field or record by record) using pre-defined files. 1.4. Data Migration Method The primary method of transferring data from a legacy system into Siebel CRM is through Siebel Enterprise Integration Manager (EIM). This facility enables bidirectional exchange of data between non Siebel database and Siebel database. It is a server component in the Siebel eAI component group that transfers data between the Siebel database and other corporate data sources. This exchange of information is accomplished through intermediary tables called EIM tables. The EIM tables act as a staging area between the Siebel application database and other data sources. The following figure illustrates how data from HPSM, CAMS, and IA databases will be migrated to Siebel CRM database. 1.5. Data Conversion and Migration Schedule Following is proposed data conversion and migration schedule to migrate HPMS and CAMS, and IA databases into Siebel CRM database. 1.6. Risks and Assumptions 1.6.1. Risks MOM may not be able to confidently reconcile large and/or complex data sets. Since the data migration will need to be reconciled a minimum of 3 times (system test, trial cutover and live cutover) the effort required within the business to comprehensively test the migrated data set is significant. In addition, technical data loading constraints during cutover may mean a limited time window is available for reconciliation tasks (e.g. overnight or during weekends) MOM may not be able to comprehensively cleanse the legacy data in line with the BSC CRM project timescales. Since the migration to BSC CRM may be dependent on a number of cleansing activities to be carried out in the legacy systems, the effort required within the business to achieve this will increase proportionately with the volume of data migrated. Failure to complete this exercise in the required timescale may result in data being unable to be migrated into BSC CRM in time for the planned cutover. The volume of data errors in the live system may be increased if reconciliation is not completed to the required standard. The larger/more complex a migration becomes, the more likely it is that anomalies will occur. Some of these may initially go undetected. In the best case such data issues can lead to a business and project overhead in rectifying the errors after the event. In the worst case this can lead to a business operating on inaccurate data. The more data migrated into BSC CRM makes the cutover more complex and lengthy resulting in an increased risk of not being able to complete the migration task on time. Any further resource or technical constraints can add to this risk. Due to the volume of the task, data migration can divert project and business resources away from key activities such as initial system build, functional testing and user acceptance testing. 1.6.2. Assumptions Data Access Access to the data held within the CAMS, HPSM and IA applications are required to enable data profiling, the identification of data sources and to write functional and technical specifications. Access connection is required to HPMS and CAMS, and IA databases to enable execution of data migrations scripts. MOM is to provide workstations to run ETL scripts for the data migration of HPMS and CAMS, and IA databases. There must not be any schema changes on legacy HPMS and CAMS, and IA databases during data migration phase. MOM is to provide sample of production data for testing the developed ETL scripts. MOM business resource availability; Required to assist in data profiling, the identification of data sources and to create functional and technical specifications. Required to develop and run data extracts from the CAMS HPSM systems. Required to validate/reconcile/sign-off data loads. Required for data cleansing. Data cleansing of source data is the responsibility of MOM. STEE-Info will help identify the data anomalies during the data migration process; however STEE-Info will not cleanse the data in the CAMS HPSM applications. Depending on the data quality, data cleansing can require considerable effort, and involve a large amount of resources. The scope of the data migration requirements has not yet been finalised, as data objects are identified they will be added on to the data object register.

Thursday, September 19, 2019

Internet restrictions :: essays research papers

I believe that World Wide Web restrictions should not be allowed. I believe that they are not helpful to the people that use the World Wide Web. I feel that the restrictions on the World Wide Web at school are too strict. At school most sites you try to view are prohibited and they are totally harmless sites. I feel that at school the only restrictions that should be put on the World Wide Web are restrictions to pornographic sites. Even these sites should not be blocked because some harmless sites have web addresses that would seem like a pornographic site but end up being a totally harmless site. With the block at school some of these harmless sites are blocked and therefor limiting the web user who made need information from sites like these. Most students know better than to visit pornographic sites at school. So this block that forbids students to visit most sites just hurts the students learning ability in some cases. There should not be a block on the World Wide Web at school and if a student does visit a pornographic site then they should be prosecuted or disciplined.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  I have used the World Wide Web ever since I was about 10 years old or so. I have found that restrictions on the World Wide Web just make researching a lot more frustrating. I hate it when I am searching for a site that would be very useful but is restricted because it falls into the blocked sites of the ones that are blocked because they are pornographic. I love researching on the World Wide Web because it is so much easier than using an encyclopedia. Most of the time the World Wide Web has a lot more to offer than an encyclopedia. You can not watch a movie of an experiment in an encyclopedia like you can on the World Wide Web. The World Wide Web is big with many sites so it is hard to restrict sites and usually is done inefficiently therefor it is blocking harmless sites.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  People that visit pornographic sites in college as an art may find a restriction on the World Wide Web to be totally stupid. They may need these sites to pass a class and the restrictions would only hurt them. Restrictions would only be limiting their knowledge so this is why I feel that restrictions would be unconstitutional. Internet restrictions :: essays research papers I believe that World Wide Web restrictions should not be allowed. I believe that they are not helpful to the people that use the World Wide Web. I feel that the restrictions on the World Wide Web at school are too strict. At school most sites you try to view are prohibited and they are totally harmless sites. I feel that at school the only restrictions that should be put on the World Wide Web are restrictions to pornographic sites. Even these sites should not be blocked because some harmless sites have web addresses that would seem like a pornographic site but end up being a totally harmless site. With the block at school some of these harmless sites are blocked and therefor limiting the web user who made need information from sites like these. Most students know better than to visit pornographic sites at school. So this block that forbids students to visit most sites just hurts the students learning ability in some cases. There should not be a block on the World Wide Web at school and if a student does visit a pornographic site then they should be prosecuted or disciplined.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  I have used the World Wide Web ever since I was about 10 years old or so. I have found that restrictions on the World Wide Web just make researching a lot more frustrating. I hate it when I am searching for a site that would be very useful but is restricted because it falls into the blocked sites of the ones that are blocked because they are pornographic. I love researching on the World Wide Web because it is so much easier than using an encyclopedia. Most of the time the World Wide Web has a lot more to offer than an encyclopedia. You can not watch a movie of an experiment in an encyclopedia like you can on the World Wide Web. The World Wide Web is big with many sites so it is hard to restrict sites and usually is done inefficiently therefor it is blocking harmless sites.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  People that visit pornographic sites in college as an art may find a restriction on the World Wide Web to be totally stupid. They may need these sites to pass a class and the restrictions would only hurt them. Restrictions would only be limiting their knowledge so this is why I feel that restrictions would be unconstitutional.

Wednesday, September 18, 2019

The Signalman by Charles Dickens and The Red Room by H.G. Wells Essay

The Signalman by Charles Dickens and The Red Room by H.G. Wells 'To be denied of information as a reader is far more powerful than to know the truth.' In this assignment I will be looking at the two short stories written in the 1800’s: â€Å"The Red Room† by H.G.Wells where a man goes into an apparently haunted room and although he is warned by other old characters he does not listen and the tension builds up as he goes into the room where fear gets the better of him in a room which might not be haunted in the end. The other short story is â€Å"The Signalman† by Charles Dickens. In The signalman a man lives separated from the real world living a lonely life as a signal man at a train station and thinks he might be being visited by a spectre. I will examine the similarities and differences between them in content, style and language and I will say something about the influences of the writers’ backgrounds and will be comparing how each story creates suspense and tension within them. Both stories fit in to the Gothic genre with different elements associated with the conventions of a gothic genre. The gothic genre of stories was brought to life in 1764 with Horace Walpole's 'The Castle of Otranto' during the Victorian ages. It included the classic conventions in the setting, atmosphere and story line mainly to create an effect of suspense, tension and mystery used in the gothic genre since then. The Red Room is the more typical Gothic genre and Wells makes it clear how ancient and old fashioned everything is in the castle and includes spiral staircases, secret passages, a suspected ghost haunted room and an eerie atmosphere. Gothic literature attempts to terrify the reader and it nearly always involves the su... ...n The Signalman descends the cutting and when, looking at the signalman whose actions are very weird and in The Red Room how the old people warn the young man not to go in the room. Suspense is also created as the signalman tells the gentleman of the weird happenings recently and in The Red Room how tension is built while he stays in the room for longer. The settings are very mysterious and quite typical of the gothic genre and are even prone to unexplainable events happening. They use the characters' actions, language and the atmosphere in different ways to add to the suspense and tension. Dickens' story is based on a more contemporary idea. Both writers also include first person narrative adding up to make two suspense filled stories and keep the overall idea that: 'To be denied of information as a reader is far more powerful than to know the truth.'

Tuesday, September 17, 2019

Cooperating and Communicating Across Cultures Essay

Case Study: Cooperating and Communicating Across Cultures The article â€Å"Cooperation and communication between cultures†, points out the key components in this case study. In the scenario each one of the team members had their own preconceived notions of the â€Å"right† way they should interact with the team in order for the team to move forward. The viewpoints of the team members, in my opinion, were influenced in part by their own cultures in addition to their own corporate backgrounds. Jim upon entering the team considered himself well prepared. He had knowledge of German culture and language, due to the fact that his wife was German and he visited Germany often, however, he was amazed at the detail in which the planning session went. Jim soon lost patience and interest, and the respect of his fellow team members because he was â€Å"hardly paying attention† anymore to the process. The German team used a three-day planning session as a way to lay the foundation for the structure of the entire product launch. Jim never really understands the importance of the initial meetings in the process because he unes out most of what was being said. Because of this, Jim never really understands the way the team is working in that the first analyze the problem, all possible eventualities, and addressing issues, then dividing the work and moving forward, with the team leader checking and controlling the outcome. The German team leader demonstrates that the team had worked together for at several years and so each knew the procedures very well but Jim clearly did not. An important organizational issue Jim exhibited is not showing respect for the Germans’ methods nd failing to align himself with the culture more rather than removing himself from the process and complaining. Fundamentally, Jim wanted to outline the problem, jump in, adjust and confer during the process but the Germans had different ideas, and a different culture for doing things. Each side saw the others’ method of operating as wrong, rather than as a possible new and different way to address a product launch. In the scenario concerning Klaus, Klaus had the same issues arriving in America and learning that the project would be put together as a work in progress rather than carefully thought out prior to execution of a plan. This is a cultural difference both sides experienced that could have been addressed by an introduction to work methods before Jim/Klaus started with their new team, which could have avoided the sense of frustration all on the project felt. Outlining the process and the roles each person would play would help the visitor better learn the corporate/national culture.

Monday, September 16, 2019

Quality Customer Service and IT

In times past quality service was not important to managers and staff that worked for the County of San Bernardino. However due to the proliferation of corruption and mismanagement taxpayers are demanding more for their dollar. It is a known fact that when local government is run efficiently more people can be put to work. The money saved from this can in turn be used to benefit the local cities. Civic improvements can be made instead of paying for people to sit at home. To create this quality service information technology needed to be implemented. This where the BAS or (Business Applications and Support) division enters the picture. The mission of BAS is to provide quality computer software support through a customer service oriented methodology. A while back, before ITSD, there were ASU (Automated Systems Unit) analysts who lead and coordinated automation projects. They would gather up the requests from the different SSG divisions/departments, do a preliminary analysis, write a work order stating the request and/or problem that was to be solved through automation. The work order would then find its way to ISD (Information Services Department) where it would be assigned to a programmer analyst who would do an in-depth analysis with the help of the ASU analyst and define the requirements for the automation project. The programming would begin and soon, a new program was created and deployed. The requests and problems soon began to multiply and expand until it was like a virtual snowstorm of requests, too many for one small unit to keep under control. Help arrived around 1990 in the form of the Automation Project Administrator – the first of the Automation Coordination Specialists gathered together to relieve some of the burden falling on ASU. The Automation Project Administrator soon gathered in a handful of Automation Coordination Specialists who took on much of the job of the initial analysis of automation requests and problem definition. They met with the users, defined the problem, wrote the initial work order, which then went to ASU to forward to ISD, and often worked with the ISD programmers. The two units, ASU and ACU, found themselves still unable to keep up with the many automation requests, particularly since ASU had years before branched out into computer hardware requisition and maintenance. Then came Information Technology and Support Division (ITSD). ASU and ACU merged into one entity, a small (but growing) and mighty automation division. ASU became Systems Operations and Support (SOS) and ACU became BAS – Business Applications and Support. The BAS Analysts do in-depth analyses of computer software requests, working with the users and their management, write detailed functionality and design specs and work with the programmers to make sure that the final product is what the user requested and will meet the needs of the department. Support nearly all software applications within SSG, including the TAD Mainframe Benefit Issuance System; GAPPS, CWS/CMS and a myriad of PC based applications as well as intranet/internet. A change in technology has occurred in the past, and will continue at increasing rate. What will we use in five short years, in ten years†¦. the future of office automation will be achieved by all of us working together. This is important in this day and age when quality customer service is the buzzword for all branches of civil service. The attached chart shows what the long-term plan is for the County of San Bernardino. These improvements will enable the line worker to put more people to work and less people on the public dole.